Art In Transit

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Education & Outreach


Art in the Community

 The Art in Transit Advisory Committee and CATS emphasize public education and outreach as an Art in Transit program priority.  The committee, made up of seven art professionals appointed by the CEO of CATS, in addition to providing program oversight,  encourages community education and involvement starting with the artist selection process through the installation and unveiling of public art. Education and outreach leads to understanding, appreciation and long term care of a public art collection.  Whenever appropriate and with available resources, Art in Transit staff explores, develops and implements educational and outreach initiatives.

Partnerships with area educational, cultural and historical institutions assist CATS in expanding the communication between artists and stakeholders and community representatives.  Partnerships provide further opportunities to engage the public in the artistic process to ensure understanding and appreciation of the art. The Art in Transit program maintains working relationships with the Arts and Science Council, Charlotte Mecklenburg Library,  Harvey B. Gantt Center for African-American Arts + Culture, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, Charlotte Art League, Levine Museum of the New South, McColl Center for Visual Art, Mint Museum, Spirit Square (Blumenthal Performing Arts Center), The Light Factory, and local colleges and universities.

There are various ways Art in Transit reaches out to engage and educate the public.  Widely distributed community newsletters announce plans to select artists for projects and update the community throughout the design, construction and activation of a new venture.  Artists are introduced at neighborhood meetings even before they begin designing art for a project to ensure their understanding of place (past, present, and future).   Printed and online information is continually updated to track project progress while finished art is documented with postcards, plaques, and introduced through guided tours and presentations.  ​


Residencies

Workshops / Presen​tations 


Exhibitions


​Temporary Projects


Americans for the Arts, Public Art Network’s Year in Review award is the only national program that specifically recognizes public art projects. Each year, 2-3 curators are selected to review more than 400 project applications of work completed in the previous calendar year. Up to 50 public art projects are chosen that represent the most compelling work for the year from across the country.  The national award is presented at the annual Americans for the Arts/Public Art Network conference.

Four CATS Art in Transit projects have earned national recognition from Americans for the Arts/Public Art Network.  Recipients of the Year in Review: 

  • 2018 Year in Review: Cornelius Park & Ride, Art by Ivan Depeña
  • 2012 Year in Review: N Davidson Maintenance Facility, Art by Jimmy O’Neil
  • 2008 Year in Review: LYNX Blue Line, Art by Thomas Sayre
  • 2006  Year in Review: South Tryon Bus Maintenance Facility, Art by Marek Ranis, Alice Adams, and RM Fischer  ​




​​

Tell Us What You Think!


 

  Phone icon  704-336-RIDE (7433)


Resources

Learn about CATS transit public art on your device while you are on the go!


Download a guide to all of Art-in-Transit's projects from 2002 - 2011


Take this guide with you for a tour of the public art at each station along the LYNX Blue Line Light Rail.

​​​

Take a Virtual Ride on the LYNX Blue Line and hear the artist's talk about their work at each station.  This video can also be used as a podcast audio tour​. 



​0:06
welcome to the cats lynx blue line public art tour the lynx is a 15 station light rail line
0:13
that runs 9.6 miles from uptown charlotte to the intersection of i-485
0:19
and south boulevard you will find art integrated at every station of the lynx blue line that is intended to provide a
0:26
unique experience for the transit user whether they ride the line daily or only
0:32
on special occasions on this tour you will learn about the art and the 13 artists who were inspired
0:39
to make charlotte's light rail line a ride unlike any other this tour will
0:45
involve both walking and riding so please follow the safety regulations
0:50
that are posted in the light rail vehicle and on the station platforms you will need a round trip or one day ticket
0:58
which can be purchased from ticket vending machines on the station platform or online at www.ridetransit.org
1:09
you will begin the tour at the 7th street station and end at the i-485 and
1:14
south boulevard station feel free to pause the tour at any time if you would like more time to view a
1:21
specific artwork the entire tour will take approximately two hours please check the links blue
1:28
line schedule before you begin at www.ridetransit.org
1:35
let's get started
1:40
this tour begins on the platform of the 7th street station located between the bank of america parking garage and
1:47
imagine on standing on the southbound platform you can see art by three different artists
1:54
look across the tracks to the passenger shelter area artist sean cassidy has designed
2:00
the etched glass of the windscreen and the mosaic column cladding he also created the leaves in the fence
2:07
between the tracks the veins of each leaf have been replaced by a street map of the area
2:13
surrounding the station placed at different angles within the fence the leaves bring to mind eroded
2:20
foliage blowing down the platform the implied movement and the altered skeleton of the leaves gives transit
2:27
users a way to contemplate change in relationship to both nature and the city
2:32
of charlotte you will experience more of cassidy's leaves featured at nine other stations
2:38
on the line and in the light rail vehicle all leaves are native to the area
2:44
listen to the artist describe what inspired his art that is now providing you with an experience
2:50
one of the experiences that influenced my work for the blue line in the most
2:55
significant way was a walk i went on with my wife in
3:01
lansford canal state park in south carolina and on that walk i found a leaf an eroded leaf
3:07
where all of the the meat of the leaf had been eroded and just the skeletal veins of the leaf were left
3:14
and i picked this leaf up and and took it home put it on my desk and set it next
3:20
to a by pure accident by next to the map of the um
3:26
of the of the stations where cats were proposing that uh sculptures be built
3:31
and there was an incredible visual similarity between the characteristics of the leaf and what a map looked like i
3:37
was deliberately trying to make use images that would be accessible to everybody so a leaf everybody has some
3:44
understanding of trees and leaves and some association or memory of of
3:49
interacting with trees and leaves so that was the starting point and then within that that idea i tried to make it
3:56
a more layered experience so for example in the in the leaves in the fence
4:02
the leaves in the fence represent both growth and decay with the green being growth and the the skeletal veins being
4:08
decay and the veins in the leaves also represent maps around the community so
4:14
it's a kind of layered experience some people will just see leaves some people will see growth and decay some people
4:20
will recognize that it's a map and it may take several times on the light rail to actually
4:27
penetrate those three ideas next to the passenger shelter you will
4:32
see a bench by asheville artist haas haley titled river rock
4:38
you will see four more of his benches later in the tour at both ends of the station casting the
4:45
low concrete walls that separate the light rail tracks from the platform called a cheek wall is a ball relief
4:52
that continues the use of the ginkgo leaf there are 47 bar reliefs throughout the
4:58
system depicting ginkgo hornbeam and skyrocket oak leaves
5:03
these 16-inch release transform an abundant material in the light rail system concrete into a unique element at
5:11
every station and the relief is cast by using a rubber mold provided by the artist
5:17
the artist alice adams who is from new york city was influenced by the
5:22
charlotte tree canopy and designed her reliefs and other elements in homage to the charlotte arboretum or place of
5:30
trees now turn right and follow the sidewalk to the ctc arena station you will cross
5:38
over both 6th street and 5th street before you arrive at the station
5:43
press pause until you are standing on the station platform
5:52
when you arrive at the ctc arena station you are surrounded by the work of well-known public artist andrew lester
6:00
his work at this station together with his work at time warner cable arena create an environment made up of several
6:07
elements that are united by a common theme the history of the textile industry in charlotte
6:23
first look down at the platform the bold pattern under your feet is the
6:29
zigzag reverse twill weave that lester discovered in the american cotton
6:34
handbook the artist translated the traditional weaving pattern into a grid for six inch
6:41
concrete pavers as a tribute to the hardworking mill employees of the textile industry in charlotte
6:49
the long and narrow platform is an ideal site to display the pattern
7:00
locate the designated pedestrian crossing at the north end of the tracks
7:05
carefully cross over the tracks to the other side of the station when you are there look over the railing at time
7:12
warner cable arena plaza
7:19
looking east from the platform you can see another work by lester in time
7:24
warner cable arena plaza he was commissioned by the arts and science council to design the four
7:31
brightly colored ceramic and brick towers called flying shuttles in 2005.
7:38
walk left to the end of the platform and down the ramp
7:55
then turn right and go down the stairs into the plaza of the arena to get a
8:00
better view of flying shuttles lester also created 23 glazed ceramic
8:06
sculptures incorporated into the facade of the arena
8:16
turn right again stop when you are standing underneath the light rail bridge
8:26
here lester designed the brick cladding for the six support columns of the light rail bridge over trade street
8:34
using three colors of brick the artist created patterns and shapes reminiscent
8:39
of bobbins of thread an artifact from the textile industry the artist talked about the importance
8:46
of using a common theme at the light rail station and in the plaza well i
8:51
think that one has to think of one aspect of public art is its
8:57
usefulness in in um knitting disparate things together it
9:02
has a it has a kind of urban design function so when for instance when wanna get to
9:10
the trade street station you look out over the railings and you see the flying shuttles and so there's a kind of an
9:16
environment that is being created there a spatial environment with these with these little
9:23
objects that are very great uh if you will independent and quite unique but they
9:30
all come they're a family of forms that are connected in terms of their theme
9:36
and i think uh and by that sense they claim a whole
9:43
space and that space becomes if you will infused with the kind of
9:48
intention of those works and the theme of those works cross under the bridge and take the
9:55
elevator on your right up to the station pause the tour until you are once again
10:01
standing on the southbound platform
10:19
when you are back on the station platform you will find sean cassidy's cottonwood leaf and the fence between
10:25
the tracks look for the solid black dot to locate your present location in the street map
10:32
that sean has used to replace the veins of the leaf now look to your right and you will see
10:38
that there is a sidewalk all the way to the next station walk toward the 3rd street and
10:44
convention center station pause the tour until you are standing under the translucent green canopies of
10:51
the third street platform
10:59
welcome to 3rd street and convention center station the artwork at this station is unlike
11:05
any other station because as you can see the standard shelters have been replaced
11:11
by 20 brightly colored sculptural canopies these canopies were designed by
11:17
well-known public artist jody pinto titled light station each of the green
11:24
and berry colored fiberglass canopies and benches are transparent
11:29
at night when lit from within or when light from the sun filters through during the day the transit rider is
11:36
surrounded by a dramatic glowing landscape pinto also designed the paving pattern
11:42
to complement the shadows cast by the glowing canopies light has always been a central factor
11:49
in my work whether it's natural light or fabricated
11:54
light it right is something that
11:59
puts people on on stage in a sense it awakens them
12:06
it it makes them see and realize the surroundings around them in a in a
12:12
different way depending on the time of day and depending on even the color of the
12:20
sky so as i was traveling around charlotte and as i was thinking about what i wanted to
12:27
do i knew from the beginning that light was going to be a central factor
12:33
for whatever i i was going to design pinto said that she views public art as
12:39
a theater and is intent on engaging the audience providing drama light and props
12:47
the fiberglass material is a performing material with light from the sun and internal lighting that shoots down the
12:54
hollow trunks of the canopies as one of the busiest stations in uptown
13:00
light station creates a dramatic link between passengers and the contemporary urban landscape and may cause them to
13:07
contemplate the future of the city of charlotte press pause until you board the next
13:13
southbound train but don't forget your ticket when the train begins to move
13:18
press play
13:31
now that you are inside the light rail vehicle look up to the ceiling this is another work by sean cassidy
13:38
here he continues his use of leaf shapes native to the area the changing colors convey the four
13:45
seasons and the parallel line suggests a sense of continuous movement
13:50
one of the things in my own work i suppose is i often try and make work that looks
13:56
like it's undergoing some kind of change or or transformation so the leaves
14:04
look like they're growing and they also look like they're decaying and the ceiling graphic on the inside of the
14:09
trains was deliberately designed to kind of reflect the changes of the season so
14:14
if you look up in the ceiling on the trains the the leaf pattern changes colors and the colors kind of
14:20
correlate in my thinking from colors that would equate to spring to summer to fall
14:26
to winter so as you move down the length of the train it's almost as if you're moving through time and
14:32
and season to create this art for the train ceiling cassidy produced an original work using
14:39
a unique layered painting process he developed i'd lay down layers and layers
14:44
and layers of paint and then i put two layers or three layers of white paint on the top and then i take an electric sander and i
14:51
sand through the layers of paint to reveal the drawing underneath so it's almost like a reverse process of drawing
14:58
not normally in drawing it's an adding process where you make a mark on a piece of paper and in my case what i'm doing
15:04
is a reversal of that by taking away material i'm actually making a mark
15:10
now look down at the seats of the train where cassidy has designed a pattern fabric that reiterates the leaf beam of
15:17
his other art the overlapping leaves and the monochromatic palette create a soothing
15:23
and unique pattern these artworks are subtle yet the artist has used them to
15:28
create an experience for the rider that is far from ordinary i would like
15:33
viewers or riders on the trains to be momentarily disrupted by the artwork
15:40
that they encounter on the light rail system and by this i mean just momentarily taken to a different place
15:48
so when they see something on the ceiling or they see the fabric design or they see you know thomas says
15:54
discs out the window it just momentarily adds to the excitement
16:00
and curiosity of the day i suppose in a sense so that often when you're riding on a train you're just daydreaming or
16:06
you're thinking about all the stuff you have to do and these artworks i think are an opportunity for to be kind of
16:12
taken outside of that line of thought and to think about something new that you might not have
16:17
considered
16:31
as the train begins to move out of uptown and across the i-277 bridge you
16:37
will pass by the stonewall station here you will find another one of sean
16:42
cassidy's leaf sculptures maple the first station in charlotte south end
16:47
neighborhood is carson station do not get off the train but take a look out
16:53
the window or the door and view the column cladding in windscreens designed by leticia huerta
17:31
the windscreens depict swirling waters and gold mining pans while the column
17:37
cladding shows intermittent flecks of gold in the mosaic tile this gold mining
17:42
imagery represents j h carson owner and operator of the rudisil gold mine which
17:49
was located under center city charlotte in fact the first documented gold
17:54
discovery in the united states occurred only 25 miles from charlotte and at one
18:00
point in time the gold mining industry was the second most common employment in
18:05
north carolina in 1835 charlotte became the home to a
18:11
branch of the united states mint producing over five million dollars in gold coins before the civil war
18:19
continue riding south to the bland street station pause the tour until you exit the train
18:26
and are standing on the southbound platform
18:46
at bland street station you will notice the intricate patterns in the mosaic column cladding platform paving patterns
18:54
and the etched glass windscreens designed by leticia huerta the winding rose patterns on all three
19:01
are inspired by floral fabrics and the victorian architecture of homes in the
19:06
surrounding south end neighborhood of dilworth walk south to the end of the
19:11
platform and turn right where you will see a low wall with a series of four
19:16
small bronze sculptures by washington dc artist eureko yamaguchi titled
19:23
dreamkeepers the intentionally ambiguous shapes allow pedestrians walking by to wonder is it a
19:31
bird or an umbrella is it a flower or a musical instrument
19:37
the artist has called this project a visual riddle offering viewers an opportunity to use their imagination and
19:44
create their own stories for these elusive but slightly familiar objects
19:52
as you turn to make your way back to the platform you will find a water fountain that has much more to offer than a cool
19:59
drink new york artist nancy bloom created the sculptural drinking fountain basins for
20:06
every lynx blue line station as you bend down to take a drink you will see a fibonacci spiral representing
20:13
natural growth patterns bloom chose to include the blossom of the dogwood tree because it is the state
20:21
flower of north carolina cast in bronze the basins will develop a
20:26
rich patina over time return to the platform and carefully
20:32
cross to the other side of the station to see another of hoss haley's river rock benches
20:38
haley replaced five of the standard benches on the line with a hand polished
20:43
concrete version inspired by smooth stones found in the streams and rivers
20:49
of north carolina the artist creates both a reason and a space for contemplation focusing on
20:56
comfort as a key element haley said that he wanted any part of the art to conform to the body in a way
21:04
that was pleasing without dictating how one would sit on it the familiar shape and the smooth finish
21:11
provide an inviting place for passengers to sit while the organic form contrasts
21:17
the symmetry and strong geometric lines of the station platform
21:22
look in between the tracks to find another of sean cassidy's leaves pin oak
21:28
turn left and walk down the sidewalk to the east west boulevard station
21:33
press pause until you are standing on the station platform
21:51
when you arrive at east west boulevard station locate the stairs at the north end of the platform go down the stairs
21:59
and look to your left down camden road
22:07
here you will find a 360 foot wall featuring 33 mosaics by area artist tom
22:14
thone by laying out the mosaics in the shape of machine cogs the artist makes a
22:20
reference to the machinery of the textile mills please use caution as you walk along
22:26
camden road to view this artwork to create his mosaics thone used the
22:31
trenches method in which irregular shards of ceramics are reused for large
22:36
mosaics in order to collect materials for the art cats and the artists initiated a
22:43
community collection inviting charlotte mecklenburg residents to participate in the artistic process by donating their
22:50
own whole or broken pieces of china glassware or ceramic pottery
22:56
the community responded enthusiastically by bringing their items to phone studio
23:02
at mccall center for visual art when they came to donate they also
23:07
shared the stories and significance of each piece with him
23:12
by incorporating the collected materials into his designs he preserved the
23:17
personal stories of the community members who donated their treasures from a wedding anniversary picnic plate
23:25
that survived a fall from a lindville gorge bridge to melted marbles from childhood from blue willow dishes and
23:33
even a sugar bowl that once held the ashes of a beloved grandfather the memories of the community are
23:40
intermingled with the history of the area that the wall as a whole outlines
23:46
there are cogs that honor the history of charlotte from the revolutionary war
23:51
through the textile and tobacco industry and even to the present day development
23:57
spurred on by the light rail
24:03
in addition to the community collection there are also original pieces by local
24:08
artists terry shipley patrick robertson and the late david ray chisholm
24:14
the artist also led workshops with students from charlotte montessori school trinity episcopal school and the
24:22
west boulevard ymca teaching them about mosaics and incorporating their original pieces into
24:28
the wall watch for cars and carefully walk to the
24:35
end of the wall then turn left to return to the station platform
25:08
as you walk observe the paving patterns in the concrete column cladding and
25:14
windscreens also designed by leticia huerta they feature a depiction of the cotton plant
25:20
cotton was a commonly grown crop in north carolina and made this area ideal
25:26
for textile manufacturing charlotte was home to many successful textile mills including the atherton
25:34
mill in the south end not far from where you are standing now where to research this historic industry
25:41
and many of her designs are based on textile patterns this particular design was based on an
25:48
intricate quilt pattern that she found in a book about quilting traditions in north carolina
25:55
press pause until you board the next southbound train
26:09
do not exit the train at the new burn station but as you pass by be sure to
26:14
notice the different shape of the pavers at the station the leaf shapes used in the platform
26:21
paving mosaics and etched glass windscreens are by leticia huerta
26:27
entitled renewal the three elements complement each other and create a living room effect and
26:33
provide a sense of identity at each station
26:40
after you pass the new burn station the train will travel under an archway
26:45
this arch is actually the cat's vehicle maintenance facility every night when the trains stop running
26:52
they are brought here and are cleaned inspected and prepared for the next day
27:11
as you are approaching the scaly bark station you will be greeted by a work made up of six sculptural disks by north
27:18
carolina artist thomas sayer entitled furrow this project was featured in several
27:25
national art publications including sculpture magazine and was a public art
27:30
network year in review selection in 2008 sayer was inspired by the shape of a
27:37
harrow disc an agricultural tool used to cultivate farmland the title furrow
27:44
refers to the cultivation trench or v left in farmland behind a plow
27:50
each 18-foot tall disk is cast from carolina earth weighs 11 tons and is a
27:57
monument to the agricultural past of the scaly bark neighborhood
28:02
the theme of the piece uh came from experiences of living in the south of knowing something about the
28:08
development the urbanization of the south which was echoed uh surprisingly or not surprisingly in
28:15
in a public meeting that was designed to for the artist to hear something from the public and at that meeting there are
28:22
actually several but i heard from people who are in essence neighbors who remember when
28:28
that area of charlotte was plowed field and the concept of the piece
28:35
came from that notion of once there were plowed fields right there within you know yards hundreds of yards of the
28:42
scaly bar station and now there is light rail which is all about spawning density in urban environments
28:48
where you want density to occur when the artist proposed his project he said
28:54
the implicit nature of the disk and their placement within the rapidly developing median of south boulevard
29:01
causes the viewer to think of what are we farming now and what does the light rail system mean
29:07
to the future of charlotte and to its history light rail is cultivating this
29:12
development the work is intentionally speaking to the change in land use from rural to
29:19
suburban and the ongoing relationship of the people to the land
29:24
furrow was sculpted using the artist's original technique called earth casting
29:30
in which the forms were created from carolina earth reinforced with concrete and steel rebar and cast in the ground
29:37
in proximity to where they will be permanently installed the entire process took five months to
29:44
complete including three months curing time where the sculptures were left to bake in the location that is now the
29:52
park and ride lot after the sculptures were dry they were installed by lifting
29:57
each disc out of the ground in one piece with a crane and placing it onto a 10
30:03
foot deep concrete footing the artist created the texture of the discs by throwing rocks at the surface
30:10
during the casting process do not exit the train but when it comes
30:15
to a stop at the station take a look at the station platforms column cladding
30:21
and windscreens designed by leticia huerta the platform paving the glass windscreens and the
30:28
mosaic column cladding patterns at this station resemble mexican bingo cards
30:34
influenced by the growing hispanic population that lives around the scaly bark station as well as her own heritage
30:41
where to said that here she wanted to design art that would bridge the gap between two cultures
30:49
each image has both english and spanish text and she sees them as a teaching
30:54
tool she said that in her approach to public art in every neighborhood you have to
31:00
talk about something that relates to the people there
31:11
as you pass the woodlawn station you will see more windscreens column cladding and platform paving by leticia
31:19
huerta titled leaves and another river rock bench by hoss haley do not exit the
31:26
train here but look toward the parking lot to see a landscape designed by alice adams called orchard
31:34
alice adams and mark raynis were two design team artists who worked with the
31:40
lynx blue line project team to develop an art plan for the light rail corridor
31:46
they identified a common theme of my place my choice my ride my story and
31:53
laid out specific art opportunities for other artists throughout the line their involvement ensured a sense of
32:00
continuity throughout the stations it was alice's deep interest in the
32:05
local tree canopy that inspired an arboretum theme that you see echoed in
32:11
many of the other artists work arboretum means place of trees
32:17
by designing a site-specific landscape plan for the park and ride lot and
32:22
concrete stamping and scoring on sidewalks in bus bays adams not only pays homage to the local
32:29
tree canopy she also activates the transitional space that the transit
32:34
patron will pass through to access the station and creates a wayfinding system
32:41
an experienced public artist who has been working on transit design teams since 1985
32:47
alice said that her goal in creating art for transit system is to make interesting the spaces that most people
32:54
will take for granted press pause until you arrive at the tyvola station
33:17
when you exit the train at tyvola station walk right and go down the stairs as you walk down you will see a
33:25
sculpture nearly two stories tall entitled reconstructed dwelling
33:31
this sculpture by dennis oppenheim is made of common home building materials
33:36
and incorporates recognizable elements of a house a set of stairs a roof walls
33:42
and windows by reorganizing the known elements of a house and setting them above a floor
33:49
plan of a typical home in the neighborhood oppenheim is challenging the viewer to rethink the conventional
33:56
idea of home the artist has said that this project is art becoming architecture and
34:03
architecture becoming a stage
34:16
during construction of the station the general contractor installed the piece using detailed plans and instructions
34:23
from the artist dennis oppenheim is a well-known public artist with work all over the united
34:30
states europe and south america his work has been featured in exhibitions in
34:36
milan athens barcelona new york san francisco and paris
34:43
take the next southbound train to the next stop archdale station pause the tour until you are standing on
34:50
the station platform
35:01
after you exit the train at the archdale station locate the elevator at the south
35:06
end of the platform as you approach the end of the station you will see the only art in an elevator
35:13
on the lynx blue line called tower of light the artist the late richard c elliott
35:21
has been recognized for his large-scale installations using small plastic industrial reflectors
35:28
the work marks both a point of entry and exit to the archdale station platform
35:34
ride the elevator down to the plaza under the platform
35:46
from inside the elevator the 36 separate panels comprised of two layers of
35:51
colorful industrial reflectors create the visual effect of stained glass as
35:57
light passes through them as you ride down the elevator and the patterns are revealed to you you will
36:04
experience a prismatic display of color light and motion
36:09
sunglass was intentionally left blank on either side of the elevator to give the rider a view of the surrounding
36:16
landscape
36:25
once you are under the platform on the plaza look north toward the bridge and then south toward the long wall
36:33
here you see two boldly contrasting colors on the bridge columns piers and
36:39
walls chosen by local artists marek rayness to create continuity throughout
36:45
the line from woodlawn station to the i-485 and south boulevard station
36:51
he also chose the form liners that add texture to the retaining walls and bridge piers
36:57
the colors that rainish chose are meant to reference the rich color of red carolina earth and the blue gray of the
37:05
southern sky also on this plaza alice adams has
37:10
designed a sculptural concrete bench that incorporates a planter where the transit rider can rest and reflect
37:18
go back up onto the platform and pause the tour until you have boarded the next
37:23
southbound train
37:34
as the train moves south to our final stop on the tour you will pass by the
37:39
arrowwood station do not exit the train but as you go by take a look at the
37:44
mosaics etched windscreens and platform paving also designed by leticia huerta the
37:51
patterns here are references to the native american pottery of the catawba indians the catawba indians were the
37:58
original inhabitants of this area living along the catawba river between north and south carolina
38:05
the black snake that you see coiled around the column cladding is one of the oldest images used in catawba indian
38:12
pottery the catawbas historically tattooed this symbol on the shoulder blades of
38:17
respected war captains
38:26
the next stop you will pass is the sharon road west station do not exit the train here but as you
38:34
pass look out the window at the large wall and bridge that surround the park
38:39
and ride lot here marek rainis chose a different form liner and color combination for over
38:46
twenty five thousand square feet of wall
38:58
here the texture of the walls resembles tree bark and foliage reiterating the
39:04
arboretum theme and complementing alice adams butterfly circle landscape
39:10
pause the tour until you reach the i-485 in south boulevard station
39:45
the i-485 in south boulevard station is the final station on the lynx blue line
39:52
at this station you will find art by latisha huerta alice adams nancy blue
39:58
and marek rayness leticia huerta responded to sterling elementary school that is in proximity
40:05
to the station the school's playing fields are actually located on the roof of the i-485 parking garage
40:13
where to visit sterling elementary school to involve the students in the station art
40:18
the graphic geometric shapes of the windscreens and the bright primary colors of the mosaics and paving
40:25
patterns were inspired by children's playground games
40:30
alice adams influenced the design of the landscape on the sloping hill deliberately complementing where to
40:36
station art the best view of the landscaping can be seen from the pedestrian bridge at the south end of
40:42
the station
40:51
i hope you enjoyed this tour of the links blue line public art you will conclude your tour here at the i-485 and
40:57
south boulevard station to return to the 7th street station make sure that you have your round-trip or
41:04
one-day ticket and board the next northbound train this podcast was brought to you by the
41:10
charlotte area transit system art and transit program i am katie stegall art and transit
41:16
program assistant and producer of this tour i hope that this tour has encouraged you to continue writing public transit and
41:23
noticing the art that makes the lynx blue line a ride unlike any other
41:28
to learn more about cats and public art visit us on the web at wwe
41:53
you

Take a Virtual Ride on the LYNX Blue Line and hear the artist's talk about their work at each station.  This video can also be used as a podcast audio tour​. 

​0:00
hi we're here with renowned artist Nancy
0:03
got Ken O'Neal talking about her artwork
0:05
in the city links Gold Line shelters
0:08
Nancy when did you begin researching
0:10
this art let's see it was back in 2012
0:15
that I was selected and I spent all
0:19
about four or five months working on the
0:21
designs maybe six months tell us a
0:23
little bit about how you integrated your
0:25
work into the streetcar shelters well my
0:27
work is collage but it's executed in
0:30
glass I have a long history of working
0:32
in stained glass but now I'm working
0:33
laminated glass as well so I've been
0:35
working with glass for a long time and
0:37
now I also work with fabricators
0:39
particularly for these outdoor projects
0:41
there they are collages I collect photos
0:44
Maps documents manuscripts pretty much
0:48
anything that I think looks interesting
0:49
if I want patterns somewhere I'll go and
0:51
come up with the seating pattern from
0:53
the arena because I'm doing the arena
0:55
station you know so everything is in it
0:57
for a reason and everything relates to
0:59
everything else in the panel any
1:01
particular stories that stand out to you
1:04
that people can go and see in the
1:06
shelters well I mentioned the Elizabeth
1:07
neighborhoods so one of the residents
1:10
there Jack clay born as a child Road the
1:13
old streetcars to go and see FDR speak
1:15
in Independence Park which was which I
1:18
featured as well as the things in the
1:20
one of the windscreens and Jack
1:22
Claiborne but then went on to become a
1:24
writer for the Charlotte Observer so you
1:26
know that was a cool connection that he
1:27
had that childhood memory of going as a
1:29
little boy to see the president speak
1:31
you know at Independence Park of course
1:34
all of the second Ward High School
1:35
Foundation the the demolition of that
1:39
whole neighborhood Brooklyn the
1:40
neighborhood that used to be there and
1:42
it's just gone gone gone those stories
1:45
were all just poignant and powerful and
1:48
moving in every way you could imagine
1:51
so those certainly oh there's this
1:53
others but those are two that that are
1:56
very different but they both really
1:58
moved me what is the significance of the
2:00
maps in each shelter the Sanborn fire
2:03
insurance maps show everything that was
2:05
there from every house every school any
2:08
kind of built structure that was there
2:10
is
2:10
is on those maps so you can look at
2:12
those maps and see what used to be in a
2:14
neighborhood a very long time ago where
2:15
there used to be a library or dry
2:17
cleaners or somebody had a well even
2:19
anything that was there is on those maps
2:21
why do you sometimes use old photographs
2:24
and other times use present-day
2:26
photographs well I like to mix it up
2:29
that way I think it's more interesting I
2:30
think people like looking at pictures of
2:32
people I think they like seeing things
2:35
that that spark something that they that
2:37
they resonate with when they look at
2:38
people the name of the whole project in
2:41
case people don't know this is making
2:42
connections and I want people to make
2:45
connections with the people in the
2:47
pictures and with what the neighborhood
2:49
used to be like and the maps will help
2:50
tell you that it's about kind of a play
2:53
on words and making connections while
2:55
you take the train and then you take the
2:56
bus you have to make the connection but
2:57
it's also about making connections with
2:59
the world the way it is now in your life
3:01
the way it is and what's going on in the
3:03
designs
3:04
Nancy are there any themes or images
3:07
that run through all of the shelters yes
3:09
let's see I think just about every
3:13
station has some reference to the early
3:15
streetcars that you used to have there
3:17
might be a photo of a streetcar one of
3:19
them has the old trolley token you know
3:21
there's but there are references to the
3:23
street cars that used to go through the
3:24
city I think that's pretty much
3:26
something from the natural world and in
3:28
every windscreen it might be the dog
3:32
would plant William barter and start
3:34
drawing of dogwood which is your state
3:36
symbol another one has the cotton plant
3:39
because that's where the old cotton
3:40
platform was that's at the CTC you know
3:43
where they used to put the bales of
3:45
cotton the hornet's nest which is your
3:47
city symbol your policemen have it on
3:49
their uniforms and so on there's a great
3:51
blue heron because people had seen
3:53
herons at little Sugar Creek there's
3:56
frogs there's I forget what else but
3:58
there's lots though the willow oak
4:00
because Mill Oaks are the major tree up
4:02
in the Elizabeth neighborhood so you'll
4:04
see there's something natural at every
4:06
station it's not just buildings and
4:08
streetcars I want people to like the
4:10
artwork just because they like the way
4:11
it looks and I know that they were going
4:13
to be people who come by and use this
4:17
trolley line speaker line just once and
4:19
they see the shelters just once and they
4:21
won't know what anything is but I want
4:22
them I still want them to be intriguing
4:24
than to find it interesting to look at
4:26
but everything in there is about
4:29
something it's somebody's story or it's
4:31
something that took place or it's
4:32
something that used to be there or it's
4:34
something happening now and if there's a
4:36
lot of information and it is available
4:38
for you to hopefully enjoy learning
4:40
[Music]